Stalking Aggravated Stalking

stalking

An individual can be charged with stalking another person in Jacksonville if they show an extreme amount of interest and contact that person, even if they did not intend to cause any harm; however, stalking is a punishable offense in the state of Florida and can result in severe consequences.

Stalking can involve a number of scenarios, including repeatedly appearing at the same location as someone else, excessive phone calls, and cyberstalking through the use of e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, Myspace or other social networks. Stalking can also include harassment of anyone who is related to the alleged victim such as a child, parent or sibling.

If you have been charged with a stalking or aggravated stalking offense in Jacksonville, you could face possible jail or prison sentences, steep fines and/or a criminal record if convicted of the offense. Contact an experienced criminal defense lawyer in Jacksonville today to begin crafting your best defense to your stalking allegations.

JACKSONVILLE STALKING DEFENSE ATTORNEY

If you have been accused of a stalking offense in Jacksonville, contact Roelke Law. Criminal defense attorney Bill Roelke will diligently make every effort to achieve the best possible outcome regarding your stalking charges in the state of Florida. Contact Roelke Law today at (904) 354-0333 for a free consultation regarding your alleged stalking or aggravated stalking offense in Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, Baldwin, Hastings, Atlantic Beach, Saint Augustine Beach, Orange Park, Green Cove Springs, Keystone Heights and Fernandina Beach.


Stalking Offenses in Florida

An individual who willfully, maliciously and repeatedly follows, harasses or cyberstalks another person can be arrested and charged with the offense of stalking, according to Fla. Stat. § 784.048. Harassment is defined as any conduct that causes substantial emotional distress in a person. Willful and malicious generally means the individual intentionally and deliberately followed, harassed or engaged in cyberstalking of another person. Even if the alleged offender did not intend to cause harm or emotional distress to the other person, they can still be charged with stalking if they followed or harassed that person.

Under this same statute, cyberstalking can include any communication through the use of electronic communication, such as e-mail, social media or instant messenger applications.


Aggravated Stalking in Florida

Under Fla. Stat. § 784.048, an individual can be charged with aggravated stalking if they willfully and maliciously follow, harass or cyberstalk another person, and also make a credible threat to them, their child, sibling, spouse, parent or dependent.

In Florida, a credible threat is defined as a threat made with the intent to cause fear of bodily harm or fear of personal safety.

An individual can also be charged with aggravated stalking in Florida if they:

Violate an injunction for protection, restraining order or protective order by engaging in repeat violence, sexual violence or dating violence against a person who is a family member or in a dating relationship,

Maliciously, willfully and repeatedly follow, harass or cyberstalk a minor under the age of 16, or

Repeatedly, maliciously and willfully follow, cyberstalk or harass another individual after being convicted of sexual battery, lewdness or child pornography against another person and are also prohibited from contacting the other person.


Jacksonville Stalking Penalties

An individual who is convicted of stalking another person can receive a misdemeanor of the first degree, which is punisbale by up to one year in jail and/or a fine up to $1,000.

An individual who is convicted of aggravated stalking another person can receive a felony of the third degree, which is punishable by up to five years in prison and/or a fine up to $5,000.


Offenses Related to Stalking in Florida

An offense similar to stalking in Florida is voyeurism. An individual can be charged with voyeurism if they secretly observe another person in a lewd or indecent manner while the alleged victim is located in a dwelling or structure that provides an expectation of privacy, according to Fla. Stat. § 810.14. An example of voyeurism is if the alleged offender peeks into another person's windows of their home or residence.

A voyeurism conviction can result in a misdemeanor of the first degree for a first offense, which is punishable by up to one year in jail and/or a fine up to $1,000.


Roelke Law, P.A. | Duval County Aggravated Stalking Attorney

If you have been charged with a stalking offense in Jacksonville, contact Roelke Law to discuss the facts your particular situation. Bill Roelke is an experienced domestic violence lawyer in Jacksonville who may be able to help you avoid the harshest penalties to the allegations against you. Contact Roelke Law today at (904) 354-0333 or send an online message for a free consultation regarding your alleged stalking offense in Nassau County, Clay County and St. Johns County.

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